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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosted by Steve Inskeep, David Greene, Rachel Martin,  and Noel King, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

For over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with up-to-the-minute news, background analysis and commentary. Regularly heard on Morning Edition are familiar voices, including commentators Cokie Roberts and Frank Deford, as well as the special series StoryCorps, the largest oral history project in American history.

Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors -- including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award. 

Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

The History Of The Congressional Recess

Aug 8, 2018

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Before the Congress takes a break from its legislative work, there is this ritual that must be performed by the person occupying the speaker's chair.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Pixabay

Tuesday was Missouri’s primary…a day that might not have normally driven many Dunklin County residents to the polls.  This primary was the exception to the rule.  That is because two propositions were on the ballot that, if passed, would have led to the construction and maintenance of a new hospital in the county.  It would have most likely been placed in Kennett.  

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Country star Keith Urban was trying to buy food at a gas station, but...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WHO WOULDN'T WANNA BE ME")

KEITH URBAN: (Singing) I got no money in my pockets.

GREENE: Why not, Keith?

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NOEL KING, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NOEL KING, HOST:

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NOEL KING, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NOEL KING, HOST:

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NOEL KING, HOST:

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NOEL KING, HOST:

Updated at 4:12 p.m. ET

Germany enjoys a reputation as a pioneer of clean energy. Its leader Angela Merkel was even dubbed the "climate chancellor" when she decided to ditch nuclear power in 2011. But the reality is much dirtier.

Centuries-old villages across the country are being bulldozed to make way to mine brown coal — one of the filthiest and cheapest fossil fuels. As the world's biggest brown coal miner, Germany is at risk of missing its 2020 carbon emissions targets.

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A growing number of Arkansas moms who can't breastfeed are finding milk donors in online communities. Some are turning to online classifieds, where not all of the buyers are new moms.

In a Chick-fil-A parking lot in Maumelle, 30-year-old Mary Catherine Fortier hands Glenda Nielsen, 27, more than $500 for about 1,500 ounces of Nielsen's breast milk.


Jerrika Longueville is a 28-year-old mother of two in Fayetteville who'd "always known I was planning to breastfeed — never crossed my mind I wouldn't be able to."

 

But Longueville has hypoplasia of the mammary glands. She doesn't have all the glandular tissue needed to produce sufficient milk.

So Longueville has become pretty savvy at finding donated breast milk on social media pages, like the Facebook-based group pages for Human Milk 4 Human Babies and Eats on Feets.

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All right. So we made it. It's Friday. We can finally go home. And - ah, let's let Rihanna say it.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CHEERS (DRINK TO THAT)")

RIHANNA: (Singing) Cheers to the freaking weekend. I drink to that, yeah, yeah.

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President Trump has sent mixed messages on just how seriously he takes the threat of foreign influence in U.S. politics - especially when it comes to Russia. But his administration is trying to telegraph to the public that the threat is real.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The Carr Fire in Northern California has killed six people and destroyed more than a thousand homes and buildings since it started last week. According to the Redding Record Searchlight newspaper, some 200 homes in that city alone have been destroyed.

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A basic tenet of economics is that when demand for something goes up, so does its cost. So, many economists wonder why today's high demand for workers hasn't translated into bigger increases in pay.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has called this a puzzle that defies a single or easy explanation. It isn't just, for example, that productivity has slowed, making it harder for businesses to justify paying more — though that is certainly a factor.

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