KASU

Education

14 Teachers Finalists for Arkansas Teacher of the Year

Aug 9, 2018
pixabay.com

LITTLE ROCK — Fourteen outstanding teachers from around the state have been named 2019 Arkansas Teacher of the Year Regional Finalists. 

Gov. Asa Hutchinson and Arkansas Department of Education Commissioner Johnny Key will recognize the regional finalists August 16, 2018, at the Governor’s Mansion. Guests will arrive at 9:45 a.m., followed by networking and a reception. The program will begin at 11 a.m. During the ceremony, the four state semi-finalists will be announced.

Dr. Kelly Damphousse, ASUJ Chancellor, giving remarks at the Red Wolf Convention Center groundbreaking ceremony.
Brandon Tabor / KASU News

JONESBORO – Chancellor Kelly Damphousse announced the creation of two new administrative positions and the reorganization of several administrative divisions in an email to the Arkansas State University faculty and staff today.

Pixabay

A recent study suggests that access to Pre-K for young Arkansans is among the top in the nation.  But, the state still has a long way to go when it comes to their development further along in their education.


A picture of the inside of a remodeled Walmart in Miami, Florida.
Wikipedia

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is offering its employees a new perk: affordable access to a college degree.

America's largest private employer, which in the past has helped its workers get their high school or equivalency degrees, hopes the new benefit will help it recruit and retain higher quality entry-level employees in a tight U.S. labor market.


An anonymous scientific survey conducted on the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville campus to measure the incidence of nonconsensual sexual contact revealed that 31 percent of women sampled reported being victims. Such contact includes campus rapes and sexual assaults as well as unwanted sexual touching.

The survey was conducted at the urging of an Arkansas legislator raising awareness about widespread sexual violence on college campuses, and that Arkansas is among more than a dozen states that do not teach comprehensive sex education in public schools — including what constitutes sexual consent.

Further illuminating the widely-reported UA survey, a female student who claims she was sexually assaulted carried around a bed sheet for weeks, raising alarm.

Leaders breaking ground on the new Red Wolf Convention Center and Hotel at the Jonesboro campus of Arkansas State University.
Brandon Tabor / KASU News

The groundbreaking ceremony for the new Red Wolf Convention Center and Hotel at Arkansas State University in Jonesboro on Thursday was more than just a celebration, but a reminder of the center’s other purpose—education.

Arkansas Scholarship Lottery Director Bishop Woosley talking with Roby Brock
Talk Business and Politics

The Arkansas Scholarship Lottery, a once troubled and embattled state program that was struggling with legislative oversite and declining revenues, has made a remarkable turnaround in the last couple of years.  About the only headlines you read these days are good ones about the program.  Lottery Director Bishop Woosley sits with host Roby Brock to discuss what’s been the “winning ticket” for the program’s success.


In the olden days, misbehaving school children were forced to stay after school and write repetitive chastisements on dusty chalk boards. Today, many public schools offer alternative learning environments for students with behavioral and emotional problems. Bentonville Public School District in Northwest Arkansas, however, has installed two intervention-rich elementary “behavior classrooms” to help children learn how to overcome chronic disruptive behavior.

Carl R. Reng Student Union
Arkansas State University

Updated 4/4/18 with additional details.

Arkansas State University in Jonesboro has received a ‘historic’ gift from a Business College alumnus. 

Neil Griffin donated $10 million to the College of Business.  At a public ceremony Tuesday, ASU System President Dr. Charles Welch read a letter from Governor Asa Hutchinson, who was unable to attend the event.  Hutchinson expressed his gratitude for Griffin’s gift.

Pixabay

  NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers have passed a bill to require public schools to prominently display the national motto, "In God We Trust."

pixabay.com

Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson has formed a committee to look at ways to improve security for teachers and students at public schools across the state.  The Arkansas School Safety Commission has been formed.  It consists of 11 members that will look at several issues that can make up for a lack of armed resource officers in smaller schools. The first report will be due July first.  Dr. Cheryl May is the director and will chair the commission.

“We very much look forward to be able to provide recommendations that will have a true impact on our schools,” said May.

Governor Bill Haslam (R-TN)
Wikipedia

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam on Tuesday proposed $30.2 million to improve school safety, which the administration says will be spread among mental health, law enforcement safety and education.

Arkansas State Capitol
Wikipedia.org

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas lawmakers wrapped up a three-day special session Thursday by completing work on legislation pertaining to pharmacy reimbursement rates, highway funding and college savings plans, just as Gov. Asa Hutchinson was saying he hopes such special sessions don't become routine.

Jerry Adams, CEO of the Arkansas Research Alliance, speaking with Roby Brock of Talk Business and Politics
Talk Business and Politics

The Arkansas Research Alliance is a non-profit that ties together the states 5 research institutions:  Arkansas State University, University of Arkansas School for Medical Sciences, University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff, University of Arkansas-Little Rock, and University of Arkansas-Fayetteville.  Roby Brock with Talk Business and Politics speaks with Jerry Adams, CEO of the Alliance.  Adams has spearheaded the organization for 10 years.  They discuss the impact the alliance has on the state’s economy, their mission, and their future plans.


Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas is no stranger to protest. Sixty years ago, following the Supreme Court's historic Brown v. Board of Education ruling, Central drew national attention as nine black students attempted to integrate the previously all-white school.

A panel tasked by Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson to make recommendations on how schools can try to prevent mass shootings has begun its work. On Tuesday, the Arkansas School Safety Commission held its first meeting. You can hear the report above.

Arkansas school students are expected to join thousands around the country March 14 in a national school walkout at 10 a.m. (local time). Billed as “Enough,” the demonstration is a coordinated public response to the shooting last month at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

It’s expected to last 17 minutes — one for each victim.

In Fayetteville, school officials are helping students coordinate a walkout at 10 a.m., though a district document also recognizes that some students have obtained a permit from the city to march on the Washington Count Courthouse — a demonstration the district has gently warned against.

Pixabay

BENTONVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Some Arkansas public schools will begin displaying hundreds of posters proclaiming the national motto of "In God we trust" over objections from First Amendment groups who say the state is using the artwork to promote Christianity.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - The Arkansas Board of Education is requiring four school districts to participate in interdistrict student transfers despite worries that students crossing district lines will result in "white flight."

KASU

BEEBE, Ark. – Huron Consulting Group today outlined a series of recommendations to the Arkansas State University System that would increase revenue, cut costs and improve efficiencies.
 

A row of men and one woman stood with guns raised to face paper silhouettes of a torso while their trainer counts off for them to shoot. The Arkansas Armory in Sherwood was holding one of its first shooting exams for the state's new enhanced concealed carry permit this month.

Applicants were aiming to hit an unmoving target 70 percent of the time, but they were also preparing for potentially more chaotic live scenarios as part of Arkansas’s new enhanced concealed carry license. It's for places like college campuses, the state capitol, restaurants, and churches. The license requires a shooting test and eight hours of training that includes, among other topics, what to do and not do in the event of an active shooter.

Governor Asa Hutchinson promoted the idea of teachers being armed in schools at a meeting with President Trump on Monday and called for federal terrorist-fighting funds to be redirected locally to schools. The President, who was hosting a few dozen governors during the National Governors Association annual winter meeting, indirectly responded by saying deporting gang members is part of the solution.

Kays House Preview— (from left) Arkansas State University Chancellor Kelly Damphousse, former Arkansas first lady Ginger Beebe and former Arkansas Governor Mike Beebe give a "Wolves Up" sign in the re-created governor's office at the restored Kays House.
Arkansas State University

A former Arkansas Governor returned to his alma mater in Jonesboro on Thursday for a stroll down memory lane.  His trip was just as historic as the building he visited.

Arkansas State University

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - Arkansas lawmakers have advanced a proposal to allow taxpayers with tax-deductible 529 college savings plans to withdraw funds for tuition at public, private and religious K-12 schools.

SEARCY, Ark. (AP) - A public school in north-central Arkansas has removed Bible verses from the walls after an anonymous complaint was made to a nonprofit supporting the separation of church and state.

The Daily Citizen reports that posters displaying scriptures had been hung in the choir room of Searcy High School.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Student journalists would largely be shielded from censorship by their schools under legislation that has won first-round approval in the House.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the idea started to gain traction in the 2016 legislative session. It stemmed from frustration over University of Missouri communications professor Melissa Click, calling for "muscle" to remove student journalists during November 2015 protests.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - A judge is weighing on whether to void the Missouri Board of Education's decision to fire the former education commissioner.

The Springfield News-Leader reports that attorneys representing the board argued in circuit court Tuesday against lawyers representing Springfield teacher Laurie Sullivan, who sued the board in November.

Pixabay

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - Revenue collected by the Arkansas Scholarship Lottery in fiscal 2018 is exceeding the totals from the same period in previous years, but net proceeds are about average for recent years.

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports that the lottery has provided its latest monthly report to Gov. Asa Hutchinson and the Legislative Council's lottery oversight subcommittee.

Pixabay

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - Researchers at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences are conducting a study to gauge residents' views of medical marijuana before and after it's available in the state.

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports that representatives from several colleges outside the state approached university researchers last year about the survey opportunity.

Pixabay

ST. LOUIS (AP) - The grounds of the iconic Gateway Arch in St. Louis may soon have a new name: The Gateway Arch National Park.

Sens. Roy Blunt and Claire McCaskill said Thursday that their legislation to rename the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial as the Gateway Arch National Park is now in the hands of President Donald Trump.

The measure passed the Senate on Dec. 21, and passed the House Wednesday.

Blunt says renaming the park will make it "more immediately recognizable to the millions of people who visit St. Louis every year."

Pages