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Craig Foster helps us appreciate and exist in the 'wild world'

Oak trees grow around moss covered rocks in Wistman's Wood, an ancient temperate rainforest, on Dartmoor, England.
Oak trees grow around moss covered rocks in Wistman's Wood, an ancient temperate rainforest, on Dartmoor, England.

When was the last time youthought about the nature around you? When was the last time you were evenin nature? Maybeyouwent toaparkorhiked anearbytrail.Ifyoulive ina rural area,maybeyouseenature outside yourwindowall the time.

What did you notice? Did you see an animal, or evidence of an animal? Did you notice a change in your mood afterspendingtime in nature? 

Craig Foster has a new book all about engaging with the wild world, called“Amphibious Soul: Finding the Wild in a Tame World.” Foster is a documentary filmmaker, known for his Oscar-winning documentary “My Octopus Teacher”. In this new book, he brings us into his world on the southern coast of South Africa. Heinvites us to learn what he’s learned in exploring “the wild world.” That’s what he calls the parts of nature that exist outside our modern civilization.

Fosteroutlines a method for how we can explore our own “wild world,” even if that’s the wildness that exists in the city or suburb where we live. Not as an escape, but as a habit we should build. And he explains the benefits of re-engaging with nature, for the sake of the world and ourselves.

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Michael Falero