Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosted by Steve Inskeep, David Greene, Rachel Martin,  and Noel King, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

For over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with up-to-the-minute news, background analysis and commentary. Regularly heard on Morning Edition are familiar voices, including commentators Cokie Roberts and Frank Deford, as well as the special series StoryCorps, the largest oral history project in American history.

Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors -- including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award. 

Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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All this week, we've been hearing the voices of doctors and nurses putting their health at great risk. For some health care workers, the front line for the pandemic is a hospital or a clinic. But for Dr. Catherine Crosland, it's the street.

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Lillian Bloodworth lives up to her name, so to speak.

Over the course of nearly five decades, the 92-year-old has donated 23 gallons of blood, starting in the 1960s. (The average person's body contains about 1.5 gallons.)

"When I first started, I would have donors read my name tag and ask if that was really my name or was that a gimmick for the blood bank," she said.

During a StoryCorps conversation recorded in January 2010 in Gulf Breeze, Fla., Lillian told her late husband, John, about why it was important for her to give blood as often as she can.

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The U.S. government has charged Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro with drug trafficking. Attorney General Bill Barr announced the charges earlier this morning. Here he is.

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I want to bring in David Wessel now. He's the director of the Hutchins Center at the Brookings Institution, and he wrote a book called "In FED We Trust" about the Great Recession. David, good morning.

DAVID WESSEL: Good morning.

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What are you wearing? And how has that changed since the coronavirus outbreak, since you started social distancing and maybe working from home? Are you in your pajamas? And is that OK?

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Some other news now - Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, tested positive for coronavirus; the prince's royal office says so. NPR's Frank Langfitt is on the line from London. Hi there, Frank.

FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

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In Kentucky, there are at least 120 cases of COVID-19, and so 5 p.m. Eastern Standard Time has become very important to people who live there because that is when they get to hear Governor Andy Beshear, a Democrat.

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Now, just days after he urged the nation to practice social distancing, the president is offering a somewhat different message. Here he is on Fox yesterday.

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When Dr. Judy Salerno, who is in her 60s, got word that the New York State health department was looking for retired physicians to volunteer in the coronavirus crisis, she didn't hesitate.

"As I look to what's ahead for New York City, where I live, I'm thinking that if I can use my skills in some way that I will be helpful, I will step up," she says.

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What's it like to be a health care worker right now? We are hearing their voices all week.

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Many industries are furloughing or firing workers, but some are hiring. NPR's Alina Selyukh has the story.

ALINA SELYUKH, BYLINE: Despite all the shutdowns and lockdowns, Americans still need food and medicine, and that means some companies are actually hiring, at least temporarily - supermarkets like Kroger and Albertsons, pharmacies like CVS and Walgreens and retail giants like Amazon and Walmart.

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This is a surreal time to be going to work inside of an airport.

"This is shocking, the speed in which this has completely changed our lives," says Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants, the union representing 50,000 flight attendants at 20 different airlines.

"When we get to the plane, the first thing we're checking is, do we have the mask and gloves? Do we have hand sanitzer? Do we have the sani-wipes to be able to wipe things down?"

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