KASU

Tort Reform

Activists on both sides of tort reform say they’ll proceed with their voter education campaigns despite a judge’s ruling stated that so-called Issue One is not qualified for the November ballot in Arkansas.

At a Northeast Arkansas Political Animals forum held at the Jonesboro Chamber of Commerce on Friday, speakers debated the merits of caps limiting medical malpractice awards and said the conversation will continue, despite Pulaski County Circuit Judge Mackie Pierce’s ruling on Sept. 6 that the proposed amendment does not meet a “single-subject test.” 

That ruling is being challenged by Arkansans for Jobs and Justice.

The 91st General Assembly of 2017, in a decision that brought Supreme Court Chief Justice Dan Kemp over to the old Supreme Court chambers in the Capitol — now the scene of Senate committee meetings — decided to put to voters this November a big cap on lawsuit awards as well as a legislative power grab.

John Brummett, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette columnist
Talk Business and Politics

Constitutional changes, including term limits and tort reform, are likely to be on the November ballot for Arkansas voters.  Could corruption in the state legislature be a factor in either of those two issues this Fall?  Arkansas Democrat-Gazette Columnist John Brummett and Talk Business’ Roby Brock ponder that possibility.