Jill Bleed / Associated Press

Arkanas Governor Asas Hutchinson at a press conference with state health officials delivering an update to COVID-19 cases.
YouTube / The Office of Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchison

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas’ largest city is planning to impose more restrictions, including a curfew, as the number of coronavirus cases in the state continues to rise.

Mayor Frank Scott said Monday that a curfew from midnight to 5 a.m. will be in effect in Little Rock beginning early Wednesday.

“This decision we did not take lightly at all,” Scott said.

The mayor made the announcement shortly after the state Department of Health announced that the number of coronavirus cases in Arkansas had risen by six to 22.

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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — One child was killed and at least 45 other people were injured when a charter bus carrying a youth football team from Tennessee rolled off an interstate off-ramp and overturned before sunrise Monday in central Arkansas, authorities said.

Arkansas State Police said the bus crashed along Interstate 30 near Benton, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) southwest of Little Rock, while traveling from the Dallas area to Memphis, Tennessee. Police said most of the injured were children who were taken to hospitals in Little Rock and Benton.

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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An aggressive effort by the state of Arkansas to carry out its first executions since 2005 stalled for the second time this week as courts blocked lethal injections planned for Thursday, prompting Gov. Asa Hutchinson to express frustration at what he believes are legal delaying tactics.

While the latest court rulings could be overturned, Arkansas now faces an uphill battle to execute any inmates before the end of April, when one of its lethal injection drugs expires.

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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — While outrage on social media is growing over Arkansas' unprecedented plan to put seven inmates to death before the end of the month, the protests have been more muted within the conservative Southern state where capital punishment is still favored by a strong majority of residents.